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Archive for the Biodiversity Category

Arctic ice threatens mass-scale species contamination for the first time in 2 mln years

Arctic ice threatens mass-scale species contamination for the first time in 2 mln years

The world is entering the most significant period of invasive species contamination in two million years as Arctic ice melts away and new shipping routes threaten to open the floodgates between foreign eco systems, causing irreversible damage. This affects a number of species and has happened before, as biologists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center explain in a recent report. For an example one has only to look at how insects invading trade-rich lands with the aid of humans have ruined local trees. Of all the possible invasive species, insects are the worst. They affect woodland areas, causing massive disruption of eco […]

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Large-scale fences can cause ecological meltdown, study shows

Large-scale fences can cause ecological meltdown, study shows

Date: April 3, 2014 Source: Wildlife Conservation Society Summary: Scientists have reviewed the ‘pros and cons’ of large scale fencing and argue that fencing should only be used as a last resort. Wildlife fences are constructed for a variety of reasons including to prevent the spread of diseases, protect wildlife from poachers, and to help manage small populations of threatened species. Human-wildlife conflict is another common reason for building fences: Wildlife can damage valuable livestock, crops, or infrastructure, some species carry diseases of agricultural concern, and a few threaten human lives. At the same time, people kill wild animals for […]

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Attracting wild bees to farms is good insurance policy

Attracting wild bees to farms is good insurance policy

Investing in habitat that attracts and supports wild bees in farms is not only an effective approach to helping enhance crop pollination, but it can also pay for itself in four years or less, according to Michigan State University research. The paper, published in the current issue of the Journal of Applied Ecology, gives farmers of pollination-dependent crops tangible results to convert marginal acreage to fields of wildflowers, said Rufus Isaacs, MSU entomologist and co-author of the paper. “Other studies have demonstrated that creating flowering habitat will attract wild bees, and a few have shown that this can increase yields,” he […]

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Jamaican iguana: Sobering update on Jamaica’s largest vertebrate

Jamaican iguana: Sobering update on Jamaica’s largest vertebrate

In 1990, the Jamaican iguana was removed from the list of extinct species when a small population was re-discovered on the island. Unfortunately, the species continues to be critically endangered, with only a single location left for the recovering population, now greater than 200 individuals, in a protected area called the Hellshire Hills, part of the Portland Bight Protected Area. A recent proposal by Jamaican government officials to allow extensive development in this area is causing concern among conservationists who have been working to save this species and the wealth of biodiversity in the area. “We have been working for […]

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Hydromorphology and Hydrobiology or River Ecosystems Changing Because of SHPPs: Expert Syran Minasyan

Hydromorphology and Hydrobiology or River Ecosystems Changing Because of SHPPs: Expert Syran Minasyan

EcoLur SHPPs jeopardize our waters and water ecosystem, as specialist in water ecosystems Seyran Minasyan said in his interview with EcoLur. “The main hazard is that more water is taken from SHPPs than it’s permissible. Besides, cascades of SHPPs destroy rivers and water ecosystems.” River is considered an complete ecosystem and is characterized with three main components – hydromorphological, hydrobiological and hydrochemical. Under the specialist, the operation of SHPPs destroys main components – hydromorphological and hydrochemical. “The temperature in SHPP increases, and though the chemical composition of water doesn’t change, it changes the hydromorphology and hydrobiology of the whole river […]

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Damage Caused to Nature – 183.000 AMD

Damage Caused to Nature – 183.000 AMD

The Nature Protection Ministry informs that from 10.03.2014 to 14.03.2014 the State Environmental Inspection detected violations during inspections it carried out, which resulted in drawing up 12 decisions on administrative fines in the amount of 730,000 AMD, while the total damage caused to environmental was estimated in the amount of 183,000 million AMD. The sanctions imposed by the State Environmental Inspection results in 1.24 million AMD to be paid to the state budget.

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Diversity in UK gardens aiding fight to save threatened bumblebees, study suggests

Diversity in UK gardens aiding fight to save threatened bumblebees, study suggests

Ecologists at Plymouth University, in a study published this week, have shown the most common species of bumblebee are not fussy about a plant’s origin when searching for nectar and pollen among the nation’s urban gardens. But other species — and, in particular, long-tongued bees — do concentrate their feeding upon plants from the UK and Europe, for which they have developed a preference evolved over many millennia. Dr Mick Hanley, Lecturer in Ecology at Plymouth University, said the study showed the continued importance of promoting diversity and encouraging gardeners to cast their net wide when choosing what to cultivate. […]

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Don’t give up on Australia’s endangered species

Don’t give up on Australia’s endangered species

Recently, there has been a lot of discussion in the scientific communityabout whether we should allow some species to go extinct. The argument put forward is that the number of endangered species is so great, it isn’t worth the resources to attempt to save them all. But in a wealthy country like Australia – which has some of the best ecologists, conservation biologists and conservation scientists in the world – it is critical that we do far better in managing the nation’s natural resources. A loss of biodiversity is an indicator of poor environmental management. Suggesting that we should let […]

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Lurking in the darkness of Chinese caves, five new species of armored spiders come to light

Lurking in the darkness of Chinese caves, five new species of armored spiders come to light

Armored spiders are medium to small species that derive their name from the complex pattern of the plates covering their abdomen strongly resembling body armor. Lurking in the darkness of caves In Southeast China, scientists discover and describe five new species of these exciting group of spiders. The study was published in the open access journalZooKeys. The common name armored spiders is given to the engaging family Tetrablemmidae. Distinguished by their peculiar armor-like abdominal pattern, these tropical and subtropical spiders are mainly collected from litter and soil, but like the newly described species some live in caves. Some cave species, […]

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Southern Ocean iron cycle gives new insight into climate change

An international team of researchers analyzed the available data taken from all previous studies of the Southern Ocean, together with satellite images taken of the area, to quantify the amount of iron supplied to the surface waters of the Southern Ocean. They found that deep winter mixing, a seasonal process which carries colder and deeper, nutrient-rich water to the surface, plays the most important role in transporting iron to the surface. The iron is then able to stimulate phytoplankton growth which supports the ocean’s carbon cycle and the aquatic food chain They were also able to determine that following the […]

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