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Arctic ice threatens mass-scale species contamination for the first time in 2 mln years

Arctic ice threatens mass-scale species contamination for the first time in 2 mln years

The world is entering the most significant period of invasive species contamination in two million years as Arctic ice melts away and new shipping routes threaten to open the floodgates between foreign eco systems, causing irreversible damage. This affects a number of species and has happened before, as biologists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center explain in a recent report. For an example one has only to look at how insects invading trade-rich lands with the aid of humans have ruined local trees. Of all the possible invasive species, insects are the worst. They affect woodland areas, causing massive disruption of eco […]

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THIS AIR-PURIFYING BILLBOARD LAYS WASTE TO CONSTRUCTION SITE POLLUTION BY JOE BERKOWITZ A new initiative from Universidad de Ingeniería y Tecnología (UTEC) and agency FCB Mayo does more than advertise–it cleans up the very air we breathe. 0 NOTES 1 PIN 11 PLUS 105 TWEET 137 LIKE  Share 84 SHARE Last year, Universidad de Ingeniería y Tecnología created a water-producing billboard in Peru. The environment-friendly effort eventually earned one Bronze and four Gold Lions at Cannes. Now, UTEC is giving Peruvians a breath of fresh air. Created once again with the help of agency FCB Mayo in Peru, the new effort is a response to an under-the-radar health hazard surrounding the country’s current […]

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Large-scale fences can cause ecological meltdown, study shows

Large-scale fences can cause ecological meltdown, study shows

Date: April 3, 2014 Source: Wildlife Conservation Society Summary: Scientists have reviewed the ‘pros and cons’ of large scale fencing and argue that fencing should only be used as a last resort. Wildlife fences are constructed for a variety of reasons including to prevent the spread of diseases, protect wildlife from poachers, and to help manage small populations of threatened species. Human-wildlife conflict is another common reason for building fences: Wildlife can damage valuable livestock, crops, or infrastructure, some species carry diseases of agricultural concern, and a few threaten human lives. At the same time, people kill wild animals for […]

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Corn Rootworm Could Be Back Big This Year

Corn Rootworm Could Be Back Big This Year

  Dow Jones Newswires04/02/2014 @ 10:46am The western corn rootworm, a Farm Belt scourge, is gaining further ground against genetically modified crops designed to kill it, marking a setback for biotech seed makers. The rootworm, a voracious bug that can undermine farmers’ crops, is developing resistance to pest-killing toxins in corn seed marketed in the U.S. by Syngenta AG of Switzerland, according to new research from Iowa State University. The study, published last month, expands on earlier research showing that the insect had developed resistance to a widely grown genetically modified corn developed by Monsanto Co. The more-resilient bugs, documented […]

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Reduced Acres Buries the Risk of $3.50 Corn

Reduced Acres Buries the Risk of $3.50 Corn

Corn prices exceeded $5 this week and market expert Jerry Gulke says the downside risk has been reduced at least for a while. By: Sara Schafer, Farm Journal Media Business and Crops Editor Even if Midwest farmers are still several weeks away from planting, they can celebrateimproving prices. Old- and new-crop corn surpassed $5 this week, and old-crop soybean prices have remained above $14.50. These prices followed Monday’s friendly round of USDA reports. In its annual Prospective Plantings reports, USDA predicted 91.7 million acres of corn (down 4% from 2013), 81.5 million acres of soybeans (up 6% from 2013), 55.8 million acres of […]

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Brazil is site of the first regional ocean health index

Brazil is site of the first regional ocean health index

With one of the world’s longest coastlines, spanning 17 states, and very high marine and coastal biodiversity, Brazil owes much of its prosperity to the ocean. For that reason, Brazil was the site of the first Ocean Health Index regional assessment designed to evaluate the economic, social and ecological uses and benefits that people derive from the ocean. Brazil’s overall score in the national study was 60 out of 100. The findings from that study — conducted by researchers from UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology (EEMB) […]

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Attracting wild bees to farms is good insurance policy

Attracting wild bees to farms is good insurance policy

Investing in habitat that attracts and supports wild bees in farms is not only an effective approach to helping enhance crop pollination, but it can also pay for itself in four years or less, according to Michigan State University research. The paper, published in the current issue of the Journal of Applied Ecology, gives farmers of pollination-dependent crops tangible results to convert marginal acreage to fields of wildflowers, said Rufus Isaacs, MSU entomologist and co-author of the paper. “Other studies have demonstrated that creating flowering habitat will attract wild bees, and a few have shown that this can increase yields,” he […]

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Jamaican iguana: Sobering update on Jamaica’s largest vertebrate

Jamaican iguana: Sobering update on Jamaica’s largest vertebrate

In 1990, the Jamaican iguana was removed from the list of extinct species when a small population was re-discovered on the island. Unfortunately, the species continues to be critically endangered, with only a single location left for the recovering population, now greater than 200 individuals, in a protected area called the Hellshire Hills, part of the Portland Bight Protected Area. A recent proposal by Jamaican government officials to allow extensive development in this area is causing concern among conservationists who have been working to save this species and the wealth of biodiversity in the area. “We have been working for […]

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Hydromorphology and Hydrobiology or River Ecosystems Changing Because of SHPPs: Expert Syran Minasyan

Hydromorphology and Hydrobiology or River Ecosystems Changing Because of SHPPs: Expert Syran Minasyan

EcoLur SHPPs jeopardize our waters and water ecosystem, as specialist in water ecosystems Seyran Minasyan said in his interview with EcoLur. “The main hazard is that more water is taken from SHPPs than it’s permissible. Besides, cascades of SHPPs destroy rivers and water ecosystems.” River is considered an complete ecosystem and is characterized with three main components – hydromorphological, hydrobiological and hydrochemical. Under the specialist, the operation of SHPPs destroys main components – hydromorphological and hydrochemical. “The temperature in SHPP increases, and though the chemical composition of water doesn’t change, it changes the hydromorphology and hydrobiology of the whole river […]

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Damage Caused to Nature – 183.000 AMD

Damage Caused to Nature – 183.000 AMD

The Nature Protection Ministry informs that from 10.03.2014 to 14.03.2014 the State Environmental Inspection detected violations during inspections it carried out, which resulted in drawing up 12 decisions on administrative fines in the amount of 730,000 AMD, while the total damage caused to environmental was estimated in the amount of 183,000 million AMD. The sanctions imposed by the State Environmental Inspection results in 1.24 million AMD to be paid to the state budget.

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